Citigroup Falls as Retail Banking Exit from China and Taiwan Nears

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Citigroup Falls as Retail Banking Exit from China and Taiwan Nears

Citigroup stock (NYSE:C) traded 0.8% lower in Tuesday’s premarket on reports the lender is nearing sale of retail banking operations in Taiwan and mai

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Citigroup stock (NYSE:C) traded 0.8% lower in Tuesday’s premarket on reports the lender is nearing sale of retail banking operations in Taiwan and mainland China, marking its withdrawal from two of its largest markets for that business in Asia Pacific.

The exits are part of Citigroup’s planned withdrawal from retail banking operations in 13 countries being spearheaded by Chief Executive Officer Jane Fraser. Since taking over in February, Fraser has focused the bank’s resources on its wealth management and institutional clients business in those countries. It has so far sewn up deals with buyers for the retail business in seven countries.

Citigroup stock has struggled since the April disclosure. It’s down more than 8% since while the S&P 500 has gained 13% in the same period.

Costs related to the exits weighed on the bank’s fourth-quarter results. Total revenue increased 1% from a year earlier to $17 billion while expenses soared 18% to top $13 billion. Net profit fell 26% to $3.2 billion.

Announcement of a deal with Singapore’s DBS for Taiwanese operations could come before the end of this month, The Wall Street Journal said. The transaction is likely to be valued between $1.8 billion and $2.2 billion, it added.

According to Bloomberg, the bank aims to sign an agreement with Taiwan’s Fubon Financial in the coming weeks for sale of its assets in the mainland for about $1.5 billion.

According to a statement last week that wasn’t part of the April announcement, Citigroup said it will exit consumer, small business and middle market banking in Mexico.

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